GM can’t find the chips to enable Super Cruise in the next Cadillac Escalade







Cadillac has dropped quite an important feature from the 2022 Cadillac Escalade. According to Motor1 and Roadshow, the model won’t come with Super Cruise, GM’s hands-free driver-assistance technology. A spokesperson from the brand has confirmed to the publications that the Super Cruise would be “temporarily unavailable at the start of regular production,” though they expressed the possibility that it would be available for vehicles manufactured later on. The spokesperson also revealed that the reason for this change is none other than the global chip shortage born out of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Cadillac’s whole statement reads:

“Super Cruise is an important feature for the Cadillac Escalade program. Although it’s temporarily unavailable at the start of regular production due to the industry-wide shortage of semiconductors, we’re confident in our team’s ability to find creative solutions to mitigate the supply chain situation and resume offering the feature for our customers as soon as possible.”

The company also told Roadshow that it was only able to build “a few” CT4 and CT5 sedans scheduled for release this year with the capability to use Super Cruise. It had to postpone the full launch of its driver assistance system in the sedans until model year 2022, which will start shipping next year. 

The global semiconductor shortage has had an extensive effect on the tech and auto industries. GM, Cadillac’s manufacturer, had to suspend production at all but four of its North American factories due to supply constraints. Nissan, Ford, BMW and Honda had to cut vehicle production, as well. In Ford’s case, it led to the delay in shipments of the Mach-E electric vehicle.

GM has big plans for Super Cruise and previously announced its plans to bring the technology to 22 vehicles by 2023. It’s unclear if these delays and adjustments caused by the chip shortage would affect the timeline it set for itself.

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