Samsung shares its chip making plans, expects to roll out first 3nm chip by 2022







During its annual event, Choi Siyoung, president and general manager of Samsung Foundry Forum, spoke about the future of Samsung’s production of chips. Despite the global chip shortage, Si-young laid down Samsung’s roadmap for building 3nm and 2nm chips.

Even though boundaries are not able to produce chips due to the whole global chip shortage, Choi Siyoung said that Samsung “will increase overall production capacity and lead the most advanced technologies while taking silicon scaling a step further and continuing technological innovation by application. Amid further digitalization prompted by the COVID-19 pandemic, our customers and partners will discover the limitless potential of silicon implementation for delivering the right technology at the right time.”

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To support his claims, Siyoung said that Samsung will start mass-producing chips on the 2nm node process in 2025. For context, current smartphone chips, which are based on ARM architecture, are based on a 5nm node process. Samsung’s next-gen Exynos 2200 is expected to be based on the 4nm process, as well as Qualcomm’s Snapdragon 898.

Samsung plans to take this even further next year as the company expects to begin producing customers’ first 3 nm-based chips in the first half of 2022. These new chips are expected to boost the performance by 30% and use half as much power thanks to the 3nm gate-all-around (GAA) node. Moreover, the 3nm chips will take 35% less space than their 5nm counterpart, says Samsung. Samsung will produce the 3nm chip at its plant in Pyeongtaek, Korea – which is currently said to be expanding to support higher capacity.

Samsung says that along with “power, performance, and area (PPA) improvements, as its process maturity has increased, 3nm’s logic yield is approaching a similar level to the 4nm process, which is currently in mass production.”

Siyoung also detailed Samsung’s advancements in the MRAM field. He says that the company is making improvements in the 14nm process in order to support 3.3V high voltage or flash-type embedded MRAM (eMRAM) which will enable increased write speed and density.

Source: Samsung




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